Program

Preliminary Program

Monday, June 12th

12:00 – 14:00 Registration

14:15 – 14:25 Welcome to EuroRV³

(Location TBA)

14:25 – 15:55 Opening Keynote

(Location TBA, Chair: Noeska Smit/Kai Lawonn)

  • Modifying Perceptual Experiments to Evaluate Visualization Techniques
    • Douglas Cunningham – Chair of the Graphic Systems Department at BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, Germany
    • Abstract: From the drawings of a small child to the master pieces of great artists, the vast majority of images created by people are intentionally designed to communicate something specific. Whether or
      not the images are any good at conveying that information is an empirical question. This is just as true for the images created through visualization techniques. After spending a tremendous amount of
      thought, effort, and time designing and implementing a new technique to make complex information easily visible, it is only natural to want to know if the technique communicates as intended. The bad news it that reliably evaluating the effectiveness of a technique is every bit as complex as creating a new visualization technique. The good news is that since Gustav Fechner created the field of Psychophysics in 1860, perceptual psychologists have been perfecting the ability to
      systematical measuring what people can see in images. Although the images used by perceptual psychologists tend to be very simple (for important reasons), a number of scientists have altered these
      techniques in the last few decades to work with the realistic images computers are now capable of producing. In this talk, I will present the basic concept behind perceptual experiments, show how it can be expressed cleanly and accurately in a single equation, and show what implications this has for designing experiments for evaluating visualization techniques.

15:55 – 16:30 Coffee Break

16:30 – 18:10 Session 1: Perceptual Experiments and Insights

(Location TBA, Chair: Steffen Oeltze-Jafra)

  • A Crowdsourced Approach to Colormap Assessment
    • Terece Turton, University of Texas at Austin, Texas, United States
    • Colin Ware, University of New Hampshire, New Hampshire, United States
    • Francesca Samsel, University of Texas at Austin, Texas, United States
    • David Rogers, Los Alamos National Lab, New Mexico, United States
  • Evaluating the Perceptual Uniformity of Color Sequences for Feature Discrimination
    • Colin Ware, University of New Hampshire, New Hampshire, United States
    • Terece Turton, University of Texas at Austin, Texas, United States
    • Francesca Samsel, University of Texas at Austin, Texas, United States
    • Roxana Bujack, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, United States
    • David Rogers, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, United States
  • Where’d it go? How geographic and force-directed layouts affect network task performance
    • Scott Hale, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
    • Graham McNeill, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
    • Jonathan Bright, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
  • Invited talk: Searching where the light is and where it is not: Strategies for better studies
    • Robert Kosara – Research Scientist at Tableau Software, United States
    • Abstract: We want to know how perception works, so we run experiments. But what we do in those experiments often depends more on what we can measure than what we really want to know. In particular, we like to measure accuracy and response time. But do we really care that much about those? Do the people who use visualization? In this talk, I will give a brief overview of the kinds of experiments that are commonly run, and then sketch the next step: where do we go from here? What do we need to re-examine? What can we build on to learn more about what actually matters – both to visualization as a field and the people who ultimately use what we produce?

18:10 – 20:00 Welcome Reception

Tuesday, June 13th

08:50 – 10:30 Session 2: Evaluation Guidelines

(Location TBA, Chair: Michael Krone)

  • Guidelines and Recommendations for the Evaluation of New Visualization Techniques with the Means of Experimental Studies
    • Maria Luz, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany
    • Kai Lawonn, University of Koblenz – Landau, Germany
    • Christian Hansen, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany
  • From a user study to a valid claim: how to test your hypothesis and avoid common pitfalls
    • Niels de Hoon, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands
    • Elmar Eisemann, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands
    • Anna Vilanova, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands
  • Invited talk: Reproducibility in Perception-Based Medical Visualization Studies
    • Bernhard Preim – Head of the Visualization group at the Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany
    • Abstract: In this talk, I re-examine a number of perception-based studies that were performed to understand depth and shape perception, e.g. in visualizations of vascular structures or DTI fiber tracts. The results of these experiments indicate whether some depth-encoding techniques, such as color scales, halos or lighting schemes improve perception over standard techniques and how different depth-encoding techniques perform relative to each other. Many questions arise w.r.t. trustworthiness and generalizability of the results. In this talk, I focus on the reproducibility, often also referred to as internal validity of the results.

10:30 – 11:00 Coffee Break

11:00 – 12:30 Closing Keynote

(Location TBA, Chair: Anna Vilanova)

  • The computational modelling of visual attention: saliency model vs saccadic model
    • Olivier Le Meur – Associate Professor at the University of Rennes, France
    • Abstract: In this presentation, we propose a new framework to predict visual scanpaths of observers while they freely watch a visual scene. The visual fixations are inferred from bottom-up saliency and several oculomotor biases. Bottom-up saliency is represented by a saliency map whereas the oculomotor biases (saccade amplitudes and saccade orientations) are modeled using public eye tracking datasets. Our experiments show that the simulated scanpaths exhibit similar trends of human eye movements in a free-viewing condition. The generated scanpaths are more similar to human scanpaths than those generated by two existing methods. In addition, we show that computing saliency maps from simulated visual scanpaths allows to outperform existing saliency models. This presentation is based on the two following papers:
      • Le Meur, O., & Liu, Z. (2015). Saccadic model of eye movements for free-viewing condition. Vision research, 116, 152-164.
      • Le Meur, O., & Coutrot, A. (2016). Introducing context-dependent and spatially-variant viewing biases in saccadic models. Vision research, 121, 72-84.

12:30 – 12:40 Closing